Carlow below the national average for recycling glass

Credit: Carlow People

County Carlow recycled fewer glass bottles and jars per head of population than the national average in the first eight months of this year, according to figures just released by Rehab Glassco, Ireland’s largest glass recycling company

The figures published to mark Repak Recycling Week show that in the first eight months of 2015, 53 glass bottles and jars were recycled per head of population in County Carlow. This figure is below the national average of 55 bottles and jars per person.

The figures also show that in that period, 580 tonnes of glass were collected in County Carlow for recycling.

The busiest recycling site in the county was Askea Church in Carlow Town, with 92 tonnes deposited in the bottle banks provided there.

Fneep

Derry/Strabane lowest recycling rate

Derry City and Strabane District Council has the lowest recycling rate in Northern Ireland.

In the first set of figures released by the Department for the Environment, Derry and Strabane council’s recycling rate was 34.7 per cent. The figures related to the period from April to June 2015.

The new Derry and Strabane council area had the lowest recycling rate in the North of Ireland from April to June this year.

Of the 11 new super councils, which came into being on April 1, 2015, the second lowest amount of household waste in the north was collected in Derry and Strabane council area (18,836 tons).

Of the total amount of waste collected in the Derry an Strabane council area from April to June, 3,796 tons were collected from kerbsides for recovery; 8,258 tons were collected from kerbsides for disposal, 3,910 tons were collected from civic amenity sites for recovery and 1993 were collected from civic amenity sites for disposal.

The total weight of household weight collected by councils in the north from April to June amounted to 254,007 tons.

RECYCLED WASTE

Derry and Strabane Council collected 7,211 tons of waste that could be recycled from April to June this year.

Of the 7,211 tons, 837 were glass; 311 metal; 1,206 paper and card; 236 plastic; 1,773 compostable; 267 electrical goods; 847 construction and demolition; 21 textiles; 589 wood and 1,126 other.

Derry and Strabane Council’s civic amenity sites collected a total of 3,890 tons of recyclable materials from April to June this year.

Of the 3,890 tons collected, three were glass; 228 metal; 144 paper and card; 1,441 compostable; 266 electrical goods; 847 construction and demolition; 13 textiles; 589 wood and 358 other.

The population of the Derry and Strabane Council area is 149,198.

The Derry and Strabane council household waste per capita figure is 119 kilograms.

Fnoop

Derry: Residents urged to use recycling centres

Residents urged to recycle.

Roe Valley residents are being urged to make use of their local recycling facilities .

Recent figures show householders brought 15,099 tonnes of unwanted items to their local centres.

Causeway Coast and Glens Council say, however, many residents in the Causeway Coast and Glens (CCG) borough are paying for a service they aren’t fully utilising.

“Residents pay rates so council can provide the necessary infrastructure to manage the items they no longer need, generally called ‘waste’,” said the Council spokesperson.

“Last year residents of Causeway Coast and Glens borough brought 15,099 tonnes of unwanted items to their local recycling centres.

“These items – including plastics, grass, wood and electrical appliances – were segregated into specific material streams prior to transfer for recycling.

“Council wishes to remind residents that their recycling facilities are free at the point of use.

“This means you can drop off the items and materials you no longer need at any of our Household Recycling centres for free. You can also use the centres as many times as you like.

“So, if there are items lying around the shed, garage or maybe the attic which are of no more use to you, why not get the benefit of the waste infrastructure you have paid for and drop them off at your local Recycling Centre.”

The spokesperson added: “It makes good sense both financially and environmentally to do so.”